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PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2011 5:15 am 
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Does anyone know if the honer 270 is available with a plastic comb? or for that matter any decent Chromatic harp? I have not been able to find any information that will support this, so i am thinking wood is all the 270 comes in(except custom) most - if not all of my Diatonics have plastic combs. I guess that it's something i am used to.. but if need be i can easily- i hope, adapt. i know the SCX 48,56 are plastic., but i dont know how they perform some might even say that they are a better quality harp.I think they might run around the same price.
thanks once again


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2011 5:34 pm 
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Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Giguchan.

The Hohner #270 Super Chromonica is only available from the company with a pearwood comb (body).

The Hohner #270 Deluxe Super Chromonica is only available from the company with a pearwood comb, but it's an improved version of the regular #270: round mouthpiece holes, screws hold the reed plates to the comb, the comb is sealed for fewer humidity problems. It's more expensive than the regular #270.

Other companies make comparable 12-hole slide chromatics, but with plastic combs. All of today's plastic combed slide chromatics have screws holding the reed plates to the comb.

The Seydel Chromatic Deluxe has an acrylic comb.

Some Hering models of the 12-hole models have plastic combs.

As far as i know, all of Suzuki's slide chromatics have plastic combs. They are excellent harmonicas, but the reeds are not riveted to the reed plates as on the other brands. The reeds on all Suzuki harps are welded to the reed plates. This makes reed replacement very difficult. It's much easier to replace a rivited reed (rivited to the reed plate).

Swan, Huang, Tombo 12-hole slide harps all have plastic combs. Of all of these listed brands, Swan is probably the least expensive. Swan is a Chinese company. Their products are excellent.

Best Regards

John Broecker


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 5:37 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:04 am
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Hello John,
Thanks for the Reply and all of the research you have done.. I am almost Ashamed to tell you that since i first posted that message i have found out a lot of the information on my own. I must say that a lot of it was not too accurate(it pays to ask around) The information you gave me was far more accurate than what i found out on my own, some of the companies- Swan, Tombo,Huang I had never even heard of.

The reason i was asking about the Wood comb is currently all my harps have Plastic(acrylic) combs and i lke playing them and are quite used to playing them- no matter how badly . I guess i will have to get used to having at least one or 2 with wood combs- hopefully not a big learning curve.

I never thought of having to replace a reed- the thought of having to do that scares me to death which might make me not want to pick an instrument that might require such work.I think the Suzuki's might be the Most expensive anyhow.. another thing to take into consideration.

John thank you for the help in this matter.. when i have enough nerve i'll gather up some breath and send it to you in the form of some kind of music!

thanks again.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 4:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
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Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Giguchan.

Here's more information about the Swan, Tombo and Huang harmonica companies. I have never been an employee of any harmonica company.

Swan was founded in 1982 (or 1983)in Jiangsu Province, China. It's name today is Jiangsu Swan. Swan makes all kinds of harmonicas: 10-hole diatonics, tremolos, slide chromatics, bass and chord harps.

The Swan harmonicas are reliable, and are lower in cost than most harmonica brands. Some people like the Swan harps, others say that they are out of tune, or need adjustments after purchase to get them playable (maintenance). I have a Swan 1664 (16 holes, 64 reeds) slide chromatic that's as good as any other 16 holer I own, but I prefer the Hohner harps.

Huang was also founded in 1982 (or 1983) as Insignia International, in New York state, USA,changing it's company name to Huang, Inc. later. It's an importer. Huang orders it's harmonicas from the Shanghai General Harmonica Plant in Shanghai, China. The world famous Cham-Ber Huang, harmonica virtuoso, designer, violinist, engineer, author, was born in Shanghai in 1925. He started the company with his brother, Frank. Both became USA citizens after 1950. Cham-Ber retired from the company in 2002, giving the company to Frank.

Huang sells excellent harmonicas at a lower cost than the German, Japanese or Brazilian companies. Frank Huang is an excellent harmonica technician, and the company adjusts the Huang harps when they arrive in New York, before selling them.

The Tombo company was founded in 1916, in Tokyo, Japan. Tombo makes consistently highest quality harmonicas, but the Tombo products aren't distributed in the USA, except for it's subsidiary, Lee Oskar harmonicas, founded in 1983 by Lee Oskar in Bellevue (now moved to Duvall), Washington state, USA.

I'll post the websites of these companies here, tomorrow.

Best regards

JohnBroecker


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 3:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
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Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello again, Giguchan.

Here are the websites for the Swan, Huang and Tombo harmonica companies. One or more of these websites may have expired.

JIANGSU SWAN MUSICAL INSTRUMENT CORPORATION (founded 1982): www.swan.en.alibaba.com
or USA website: www.swanmusicstore.com/detailed/30612.html

HUANG, INC. (FORMERLY INSIGNIA INTERNATIONAL, founded 1982): www.huang-inc.com E-mail: huang-inc@worldnet.att.net

TOMBO MUSICAL INSTRUMENT CO., LIMITED (founded1916): www.tombo-m.co.jp/eng/menu.html

If you are intterested in their products, check the websites.

Best Regards


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 3:42 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:04 am
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John,
Thanks for the useful replies. I will take your information and store it for future refrence. I now remember that in the past i did have some Lee oskar harps. I thought the name Tombo was familiar. I might even have some of them floating around- indeed they were fine harmonicas. I dont know too much about the other brands, but thanks to your info i'll give them a look see.
thanks again.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:43 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 08, 2010 8:02 pm
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Swan like all other manufacturers makes several different models of each harp... The chromatics in the professional models (have professional on the covers) now have the phosphor bronze reeds, right up there with the Suzuki chroms. Both Suzuki and Swan and Sydel all have plastic combs available in their chroms. I own the Suzuki SCX 1664 and also a Swan 1248. The 1664 is a bit richer with the lower pitches available and the pure size of the instrument. I also own Swan tremolo sets, one with brass reeds and one with phosphor bronze reeds. I also own a Swan diatonic set as well, Since I bought my set some 3 years ago Swan now has some very good to excellent 10 holes. Just a note, the Chinese companies are making harmonicas and reeds for a number of companies now including Hohner, so quality is only an issue based on model. I think that Sydel is one of the only manufacturers who still make their own reeds and fully assemble and tune their harps.....(by this time They may also be using Chinese components but this is strictly speculation. It was good to find Swan opening their own store in CO. USA where I bought my last set of tremolos with the phosphor bronze reeds....about a year ago.. Yvonne is the contact there. BTW they have a toll free phone 1-888-785-SWAN


Rayzor


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 15, 2011 5:11 am 
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Rayzor,
Hey there! thanks for the reply. I have already decided and ordered my choices. I was given a new model 270 as a gift for helping out a friend. I was going to go with Suzuki, but i already have a bunch of their diatonics so i decided to go with seydel.I am not as advanced as you are... i dont think i would know what to do with a Tremelo harp hahaha that might be a little while down the road.

I think i used to have a swan a few harps ago. I did like them they are a great harp.

Thanks for all of the help that you have given me and for that matter anyone else who reads this post.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 4:59 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:04 am
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Guys,
what do you all think about the Hohner chromatica 280 C? I just recently aquired one.. let me tell you something it's a lot diffrent than the 270... but i like it just the same.... i'm a newbie when it comes to Chromo... I thought i heard that is the same harp that little walter used...


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 6:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
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Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Giguchan.

The Hohner #280 "64 Chromonica" was the world's first mass-produced 16-hole slide chromatic harmonica (1928). It's been used by thousands of slide chromatic players up to this day.

The first models had a pearwood comb, reed plates nailed to the comb, leather windsavers (valves) over the reed slots, round mouthpiece holes. It also had the internal ("safety pin") slide spring, first introduced by Hohner in 1928 by William Hausler, Chairman of the New York Hohner office.

Today, it has a plastic comb, screws hold the reed plates to the comb, plastic valves.

It's a great harmonica at a low price, compared to the other major companies that make 16-hole slide harps (Hering & Suzuki).

I'm not an employee of any harmonica company.

Best Regards

John Broecker


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 10:59 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:04 am
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John,
This thing is a sandwich!(a name i made up for big harps) I also figured that it's not too easy- or at all to bend notes on a chromo. I have a few chromo seydels, your right i believe the seydels were higer in price that the Hohner. Great harp for the money... the "270" was a gift that i dont have yet. i just bought the "280"because i'm impatient.. I kind of like the idea of an acryrlic comb. I was advised that the wood has adverse effects after a while- when the 270 arrives i wont has a choice..
Tell you what though trying to get this thing around a MIC has me wondering how walter and all of the greats were able to manage one hand with the harp/mic the other hand around a whiskey bottle- either that or a .44
Thanks for the replies..


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 3:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
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Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Giguchan.

The most popular way to play a 64 reed chromatic harp (16-holer), with a microphone, is to hold the harmonica in the left hand, between the thumb & first finger, with the lowest pitched 4 holes' backside resting on the "web" area connecting the thumb and 1st finger.

The lowest 4 holes on the left of the mouthpiece aren't generally used as much as the next 12 holes. This hand grip allows for cupping and hand vibrati, using the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers.

To include the mic, I cup around my Shure Green Bullet mic with the right hand, holding the mic in the right hand, like holding a tennis ball.

Others play with a mic (any favorite) on a stand. This allows complete freedom in harp placement in the hands, and more hand effects are available.

Little Walter was a 99% diatonic 10-hole harmonica player, rarely using a slide chromatic.
The ten-hole diatonic harps are considerably easier to "handle" than the clumsy (at times)16-holers.

Best Regards

John Broecker


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 3:56 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:04 am
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John,
Thanks for the reply.
I forgot that LW played primarilly 10 holes. for some reason i thought he used a slide i think i saw a picture of him with a long harp , so i thought it was a chromo... to say nothing of his playing.... i need to pay more attention i guess. rather my ears do.

Thanks for the tips on how to hold a large harp! i'm sure that the instructions will help out a lot.


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