Members


It is currently Mon Jul 28, 2014 6:14 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:28 am
Posts: 7
Hi all, I recently received a number of Harmonicas from my grandfather which he collected. I don't have any inclination towards playing or collecting so would like some feedback who would be interested:

1 x M.Hohner - 52/240M – 6
1 x M.Hohner - 53/192M – 4
1 x M.Hohner – The Larry Adler Professional 16 – 7574/64M
2 x M.Hohner – Chrometta 8– C
1 x M.Hohner – Goliath – 453/48M
1 x M.Hohner – The Echo Harp – 55/80M2–C/G
1 x M.Hohner – The Echo Harp – 54/64M2–C/G
1 x M.Hohner – The Echo Harp – 57/120M–C/G
1 x M.Hohner – Rheingold – 2475/56M–
1 x M.Hohner – Rheingold – 2474/48M–C
1 x M.Hohner – Chromonica 280– C
1 x M.Hohner – Blues Harp
1 x M.Hohner – Pro Harp – F
1 x M.Hohner – Pro Harp – C
1 x M.Hohner – Golden Melody - 2416 – C
1 x M.Hohner – COMET – G
1 x M.Hohner – ECHO – 2509
1 x M.Hohner – Song Band Model 1 –
1 x M.Hohner – ECHO – 2409
* Thremolo Tuning -8211/40M – C
1 x M.Hohner – ECHO – 2309
1 x M.Hohner – ECHO – 8362/32G – C
1 x M.Hohner – ECHO – 2209
1 x M.Hohner – “Trutone” Pitch Pipe – P3– A440
1 x M.Hohner – Sonny Boy (Medium)
1 x M.Hohner – The Hohner Band – 6196/28 M2–C
1 x M.Hohner – Sonny Boy (Large)
1 x M.Hohner – The Hohner Band – 6195/32 M2–C
1 x M.Hohner – The Regulation Band
1 x M.Hohner – The Hohner Band – 7330/40 MC–C
1 x M.Hohner – Little Lady – Key Ring (Mini)
1 x M.Hohner – Tango – 6715/32 – C
2 x M.Hohner – No. 39 (Mini)
1 x M.Hohner – Tango – 6716/64 – CG
3 x C.A.Seydel Sohnen – The Music Master
3 x M.Hohner – The Three Sisters – C * 6194/24 M3
3 x C.H.Weiss.Trossingen – Three Little Boys
1 x C.H.Weiss.Trossingen – The Brass Band Harmonica – E
1 x C.H.Weiss.Trossingen – The Brass Band Harmonica – F
3 x C.H.Weiss.Trossingen – The Brass Band Harmonica – G
1 x Rigoletto
1 x Firefly Rigoletto – C
3 x Astra – Delicia
1 x Radio – C
3 x Popular– Delicia – C
2 x Popular– Delicia – F
5 x The Three Graces – F
3 x Artist - Delicia – F
3 x Artist – Ligna – CF
1 x Sonhadora – C-DO
1 x Hering Escolor – C-DO
1 x Rollinha – Hering – ref. 95 s/48
2 x Sonhadora Luxo – C-DO

And a number of them made in India and China which I might think is worthless


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:50 pm
Posts: 696
Wow! Your grandpops had quite a collection there...

I, myself, couldn't evaluate them; but well-known harmonica customizers/collectors/sellers Richard Sleigh and/or David Payne most likely could and would.

You can contact them via their respective websites here:

http://rsleigh.com/

http://elkriverharmonicas.com/

Good luck!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:28 am
Posts: 7
Thank you I have contacted them


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 4:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Antono07.

Welcome to the Harmonica Club.

You have some popular and some not so popular harmonicas in your grandfather's collection.

It's a long list, so we'll discuss about 10 models per posting.

The sale value of each instrument is whatever the seller and buyer agree on, and whatever condition the harmonicas are in.

The first 11 on the list:

I don't have the catalog numbers memorized, but here goes:

Hohner #52/240M: Is this a set of 6 tremolo harmonicas (Hohner Tremolo Sextet?)connected with a 6-spoked metal disk on each end, with a finger handle on each end? If yes, they are excellent harmonicas. This is not a rare, but common instrument. The sextet has 6 times as many harmonicas as a single Hohner Tremolo, so you should sell it for 6 times the price of a single tremolo harp, if it's in playable condition. The usual set includes keys of Bb,F,C,G,D,A.

Hohner 53/192M: Is this the Hohner Tremolo Quartet, a set of 4 harmonicas described as above, with a 4-pointed disk and finger handles? This model is more scarce than the sextet, but is still a common instrument. It is 4 times as many harps as the single tremolo, so you should sell it for 4 times the price of a single tremolo, if it's playable. Keys are usually F,C,G,D.

Larry Adler Professional 16 #7574/64M: This is a 16-hole slide chromatic harmonica, in C, made by Hohner. The famous slide harp player Larry Adler never played this model. He liked the 12-hole size, Super Chromonica #270, but this is labeled to sell more harmonicas. It's identical to the #280-64 Chromonica listed below, except for the engraving on the metal reed covers, if both harmonicas are of the same vintage. The older models had a wood (pearwood) comb, and the relatively newer models have plastic combs. The Larry Adler models cost a few dollars more than the 64 Chromonicas, but play the same. These are common harmonicas, they should be worth about 3 times the sale value of a $30, new 10-hole diatonic harmonica, if playable and in good condition.

Hohner Chrometta #8, in C. If your Chrometta 8 has a red plastic comb (body), it's the older version, with nails holding the reed plates to the comb. This is not as well made as the later version, with black plastic comb and screws holding the reed plates to the comb. The red comb Chrometta 8 was the first Hohner slide chromatic to use a plastic comb, introduced in 1956. The red plastic comb is more brittle than the black plastic comb, and maintenance is easier with the newer model removeable screws, than the nails holding the reed plates on the older model. This is a common instrument, and for a performer, it's 8 hole (2 octaves range) is not as useful as the 10-, 12, or 14-hole Chromettas, so it may not be as valuable. It's the smallest size Chrometta, and is probably not worth more than the price of a new $30,10-hole diatonic harmonica, if playable and in good condition.

Hohner Goliath #453/48M: This is a favorite among Latin American and eastern European tremolo harmonica players. It has a pearwood comb with nails holding the reed plates to the comb. It has 48 reeds (24 double holes). It's a common instrument,and may be worth about twice the price of a new $30,10-hole diatonic harmonica, if playable, and in good condition.

Echo Harps #55/80; 54/64; and 57/120 are two-sided tremolo or octave harmonicas (I've forgotten which type). The #54 has 16 double holes on each side (total 64 reeds); the #55 has 20 double holes on each side (total both sides, 80 reeds), and the #57 has 30 double holes each side (total 120 reeds). These are common harps, worth (if playable) about 3 times the value of a new $30, 10-hole diatonic harmonica. They have pearwood combs and nails holding ghe reed plates to the comb.

Hohner Rheingold #2474; #2475: These are tremolo harmonicas, not available in the USA unless by special order (not in the USA Hohner catalog). They are common instruments. The 2474 has 24 double holes(48 reeds), in the key of C.The 2475 has 28 double holes(56 reeds).The Rheingolds are probably worth each, about twice the value of a new, $30, 10-hole diatonic harmonica, if playable and in good condition.They have pearwood combs and nails.

Hohner #280, 64 Chromonica: It's a 16-hole slide chromatic harmonica. The newer vintage models have black plastic combs, and the mid-vintage 64s have a plastic, simulated wood grained comb, and the oldest models have a pearwood comb. The older models have nails holding the reed plates to the comb, and the newer models usually have screws holding the reed plates to the comb. There was a middle period when the 64 Chromonicas had a pink or tan-colored plastic comb with nails (drift pins) holding the reed plates to the comb.

The older harmonicas, according to people who've played them, are preferred for their better reeds than the newer reeds. The older reeds (pre-1940) were made from a different brass alloy than the post 1940 reeds. The sound on the pre 1940 reeds was better than the sound of the newer models, according to the players.

However, the newest type 64 Chromonicas from circa 1990 to the present (?) have screws holding the reed plates to the comb, making repairs easier. The plastic combed models from about 1960-1990 had drift pins (nails) holding the reed plates to the comb, and that made repairs extremely difficult. The wood combs of the older models have problems with humidity (cracking combs, warping, peeling, splitting, etc.)

The 64 Chromonica was the world's first 16-hole (4 octave range) slide chromatic, introduced circa 1928. It's the world's most popular 16-hole slide chromatic today. It's a common instrument, and might be worth the price of 3 new,$30 diatonic 10-hole harmonicas today, depending on playability and condition of the harmonica.

We'll discuss another 10 of your grandfather's harmonicas tomorrow.

Best Regards

John Broecker


Last edited by john_broecker on Tue Nov 08, 2011 6:19 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 4:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:28 am
Posts: 7
Hi John,

I'm a sucker for history and facts and this made for some interesting reading. I greatly appreciate your knowledge of these harmonicas and shocked how each has its own little history.

Looking forward to the next installment as I eye the harmonicas you discussed differently.

Regards


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 4:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello again, Anton07.

Here are 11 more models from your grandfather's collection.

All of the harmonicas listed here are common instruments. If each harmonica is playable, and in good condition, a fair price would be half the price of a new model of the same model brand, name and size.

Hohner #532 Blues Harp: This is a diatonic (one major scale factory installed)10-hole richter reed placement system harmonica. The older models have a pearwood comb, and nails hold the reed plates to the comb. The newer models have pearwood combs, but might have screws holding the reed plates to the comb (a guess).

Hohner #562 Pro Harp: This is another diatonic 10-holer. It has flat black enameled covers. When the model was introduced, the black enamel paint offered an alternative to the nickel-plated brass covers of other harmonica brands and models. Some people are allergic to nickel. The Pro Harp has a plastic comb, and screws hold the reed plates to the comb.

Hohner #2416 Golden Melody: This is a tremolo harmonica, with 20 double holes (40 reeds). It has a plastic comb. Tremolo harmonicas have two vertically stacked reeds of the same note spelling in two seprate vertical reed chambers. One of the two vertical reeds is de-tuned at the factory, to produce a wavy tone (tremolo) when the 2 vertical reeds are played together. This model had nails holding the reed plates to the plastic comb in older models, and it may be the same today.

Hohner #2503 Comet (16 double holes, 32 reeds) and #2504 Comet (20 double holes, 40 reeds): Comet harmonicas are octave-tuned harmonicas. Octave harmonicas have two vertically-stacked reeds in two separate vertical chambers, with one of the two reeds pitched an octave higher (8 scale notes) than the other vertically stacked reed. When the two vertically paired reeds are played together, the sound is more resonant than a single reed per note harmonica (10-hole blues band type), or a tremolo harmonica. The octave tuning produces a louder sound. They have plastic combs, and probably have nails (drift pins) holding the reed plates to the comb.

Hohner #2309 Echo(16 double holes, 32 reeds; #2409 Echo (20 double holes, 40 reeds); and #2509 Echo (24 double holes, 48 reeds):These are tremolo harmonicas with pearwood combs. Nails hold the reed plates to the comb.

Hohner #8362 Echo (16 double holes, 32 reeds): This is also a tremolo harmonica, with pearwood comb, nails.

Hohner #P3 Trutone Pitch Pipe: This is a pearwood comb pitch pipe, normally used for tuning in choral groups, or for instrument tuning reference. It has a one octave (13 single reeds) chromatic (half-step) range, C-C. It has a sliding reed selector to locate and isolate one reed for playing. By removing the reed selector, you can play chromatic tunes that have a range of an octave or less.

Hohner Three Sisters #7661 (12 doble holes, 24 reeds) and #7662 (14 double holes, 28 reeds) are scarce. They were made circa 1910-1930 (a guess) for the South African market. There are hundreds of harmonicas with women's names, but only 2 are known to have a make-up mirror attached, for the ladies. The Three Sisters harmonicas were advertised as "The 'Clou' of mouth organs" (mouth organs = harmonicas). They were antique harmonicas, not made today.

(UPDATED 6-26-11: Hohner made a third model of the Three Sisters, #6194, with 12 double holes, 24 reeds, and no mirror.)

#7661 had a mirror attached to the harmonica's audience side, and it measures from left to right on the mouthpiece, 3.75 inches.

#7662 had a mirror that served as the bottom cover, and measures from left to right, 4-5/8ths inches. They were both tremolo harmonicas, presumably with pearwood combs and nails holding the reed plates to the comb.

What does the word, "Clou" mean? I don't know. More harmonicas will be discussed in the next post.

Best Regards

John Broecker


Last edited by john_broecker on Tue Nov 08, 2011 6:23 pm, edited 4 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 7:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:28 am
Posts: 7
I had a look and have no idea what "clou" means.

You truly have a vast knowledge of harmonicas. Where is the best place to sell these? Ebay

After reading your inserts I'm thinking of keeping a few select ones.

Regards


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 5:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Anton07.

Since a few harmonicas of your grandfather's (now your) collection are collectible antiques, and others are just plain fun, it would be good to keep those models that you know will be hard to find in the future, and the models that aren't collectibles (commonly sold today) but are fun to play.

I have a collection of over 300 harmonicas, and know a few people that have more than 3,500 harmonicas. Each collector has a different criteria as to which harps to keep, and which ones to sell or trade. I tend to keep the ones that are scarce or rare, or are unique in one way or another. And, in good condition.

Some people think that I have a vast knowledge of harmonica history, but in reality, I know very little about harmonica history. That's why I also collect harmonica mediae (catalogs, newsletters, recordings, etc.). I have been, for the last 5 years, writing a harmonica history book, collecting data from hundreds of sources.

E-bay would be a good way to dispose of the models that you wish to sell. Other options include internet harmonica forums such as the Harmonica Club, Slidemeister, Elk River Harmonicas, etc. You will not get rich selling your harmonicas. Harmonicas in general do not appreciate in value after the years, in fact, they depreciate in monetary value, unless they are rare. Harmonicas are the world's most popular musical instruments, not only because they are fun and portable, but, mostly because they are cheap, compared to other musical instruments.

If you have additional questions about your harmonicas, ask Harley Crain, president of Harmonica Collectors International (HCI): e-mail: hcrain@harleysharps.com

Here is information about more of your collection.

Most of these harmonicas are common, so are not valuable to collectors, but performers may want them. Some models have have had name changes, but they have kept their catalog numbers. They all have wood combs, unless specified otherwise. The Hohner harmonicas use a wood (pearwood) that is plentiful in the Trossingen, Germany area (headquarters of Hohner). Other companies may use a different wood that is plentiful in their location:

Hohner Song Band #8211 and #8214: Yesterday, I couldn't find any info on these, but found it today.

(UPDATED 6-26-11: The Hohner Song Band was a series of at least 4 different harmonicas made in England by Hohner from the early 1920s, maybe longer.)

The #8211 has 20 double holes, 40 reeds, measures 6-1/4" long and is a tremolo harmonica. (UPDATED 6-26-11: It has holes numbered 1-20 on the upper cover, made circa 1925+).

(UPDATED 6-26-11: The #8212 was labeled, "organ tuning," and was an octave harmonica, with 20 double holes, 40 reeds, and was 6-1/4ths inches long. made circa 1925+).

(UPDATED 6-26-11: The #8213 was labeled, "alto tuning," and was probably a lower octave starting range, like the "tenor-tuned" chromatic harps of today. It had 20 double holes, 40 reeds, and was 6-1/4ths inches long, made circa 1925+.)

(UPDATED 6-26-11:#8214 was a "vamper," (standard 10-hole diatonic) and had 10 single holes, 20 reeds, measuring 4" long. It had metal strips over the wood comb's tines (hole dividers),like other Hohners (Ironclad, Orchester series, etc.). It was made from about 1920+.)

HOHNER BAND = UNSERE LIEBLINGE

(UPDATE 6-26-11: The Hohner Band harmonicas were made for the english-language countries, and the Unsere Lieblinge harmonicas were made for the german-language countries. They were made circa 1912?-1970?)

Hohner Band #132, #2329, #6160, #6194, #6195, #6196: These models have a long history, some going back 100 years, others 90+ years.

#132 Hohner Band was produced from 1924-1938 (a guess), with 10 holes, 20 single reeds, and was a single reed diatonic (like today's #1896 Marine Band). This one may be the most scarce of the Hohner Band models, because it's the only one I found that's a single reed diatonic, and was only made for 14 years(?).

The following Hohner Band-Unsere Lieblinge harmonicas are all tremolo harps, unless specified otherwise:

#2329 Hohner Band is a copy of the #6195 Hohner Band, re-issued in 1994, as a limited edition. #6195 is a tremolo harp, with 16 double holes, 32 reeds, 5" long, made from 1912-1970 (?). The Unsere Lieblinge ("Little Darlings") harmonicas are made today, with the same catalog #6195.

#6160 Hohner Band was made from 1912-1970(?). It has 12 double holes, 24 reeds, measuring 4" across the mouthpiece. It may possibly have been changed to the #6194, with a name change to Unsere Lieblinge, still made today.

#6194 Hohner Band was made from 1912-1970(?), and has been re-named, "Unsere Lieblinge". It has 12 double holes, 24 reeds, is 4" long, and is a tremolo harp, made today.

(ADDED 6-28-110): #6195 Hohner Band was made from 1912-1970?, and had 16 double holes, 32 reeds, measured 5'' long, and was a tremolo harp.

#6196 Hohner Band was made from 1912-1970(?), and has been re-named, Unsere Lieblinge. It has 14 diouble holes, 28 reeds, is approx. 4-1/2" long. It has been re-named, Unsere Lieblinge, and is made today.

The Unsere Lieblinge harmonicas have an interesting story. In the first few years or so (circa 1936-38), the cardboard box had the model name Unsere Lieblinge, plus 2 ovals printed with women's faces. The next few years, empty ovals were printed in the box. The next few years the ovals included portraits of 2 different (more modern-looking hair styles) women, one in each oval. When Ronald Reagan was the USA President,1981-89, and Gorbachev(?) was the Soviet Union Premier, their faces were in the ovals.

Hohner had a sense of humor, calling these 2 politicians "Little Darlings". The Gorbachev-Reagan Unsere Lieblinge boxes are valuable to collectors. The Reagan-Gorbachev(?) faces have been replaced with the womens' faces, probably sometime after the careers of the two politicians had ended.

ADDED 6-28-11:The Hohner Regulation Band #310 was made from circa 1902-1914? had 14 double holes, 28 reeds and measured length was 4-3/8th inches. It was a tremolo harp.

Hohner #7330 Regulation Band was made from 1902-1914, and had 20 double holes, 40 reeds, and was later re-named, Unsere Lieblinge. The Regulation Band was also made by the F.A. Bohm harmonica company, of Klingenthal, Germany. It's suggested that the two companies collaborated on this venture. Bohm listed a D.R.W.Z #182084 on it's cardboard box. A third company, C.A. Seydel Sohne, made a harmonica identical to the Hohner-Bohm Regulation Band, with Seydel's model named Registration Band.

Hohner #39, #109 Little Lady harmonicas: The world's first known mass-produced mini harp was the Hohner #39, made from 1924 to today. In December 16th,1965, USA astronaut Wally Schirra smuggled a Little Lady aboard the Gemini 6 space craft, and played "Jingle Bells" while circling the moon.

The Little Lady is as of this date, the only musical instrument played in space, if not including the sleigh bells played by Schirra's astronaut partner, Jim(?)Stafford. The Little Lady was listed in the Guiness Book of World Records as the World's Smallest Musical Instrument. It's 4 holes with 8 reeds permit playing of a complete scale, plus limited chords. The #109 is a Little Lady with a key ring attached. Both harmonicas are sold today.

This is getting long, so, we'll stop here. More harmonicas in the next post.

Best Regards

John Broecker


Last edited by john_broecker on Tue Nov 08, 2011 6:30 pm, edited 7 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:50 pm
Posts: 696
Great job, J_B!

I myself am curious to read about those Sonny Boys (medium and large) and Three Little Boys, respectively.

What all do these refer to?!

Thanks!

SPD


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2011 5:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:50 pm
Posts: 696
BTW: I did find a definition for "Clou" here:

clou – noun
a major point of interest or attention.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Origin:
1880–85; < French: literally, a nail < Latin clāvus


And it's actaully pronounced: Clue or Clew

Considering the Three Sister harps were made for the South African market, with (attachable/detachable?) mirrors for the ladies --

Being that it seems to be a rather obscure word or term in and of itself...'The Clou of Mouth Organs!'

Gotta wonder now: Just how long did that advertising intern last at his/her job back in the day?!

Mwuahahaha!!

Laters...

Rock on, yo! 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 4:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Anton07 and Street Player Dude.

Here is part 3 about the harmonicas in Anton's collection. There have been some updates made to part 2. Please re-read the second part. You have enough harmonicas for a fourth part, possibly a part 5. We'll see what happens.

There are a few updates to the information made in a prior post about the "Regulation Band" harmonicas. Please re-read the prior post.

Another place to sell all or part of your collection is http://www.amazon.com. It's not an auction, like e-bay, and you can set your price for the harmonicas.

Your harmonicas, continued, part 3:

C.A. Seydel Sohne (C.A. Seydel Sons) was the name change for the C.A.Seydel harmonica company. Christian August Seydel founded the company in 1847 in Klingenthal, Germany, and died in 1908. His sons took over the company after his death, adding "Sohne" to the name.

Music Master is a series of at least 15 different models, found in the 1923 Seydel catalog. They had wood combs, nails holding the reed plates to the combs. If you can describe your Music Master (amount of holes, single or double holes, one or 2-sided harmonica, keys, etc.) we will get a better idea as to which Music Master you have.

In the 1999 catalog, there were no Music Master harmonicas, and in the 2004 catalog, one model, a 10-hole diatonic with plastic comb was shown. After 2004, no Music Masters are in the Seydel catalogs.

Hering Sonhadora models are octave harmonicas, with wood combs, of different sizes, and are made today. No first production date has been found yet:

#8332 has 16 double holes, 32 reeds.
#8340 has 20 double holes, 40 reeds.
#8348 has 24 double holes, 48 reeds.

Hohner Sonny Boy harmonicas were made from circa 1929?-1998?. They may have been named for the great harmonica players, Sonny Boy Williamson I and/or Sonny Boy Williamson II, but, I don't think so. The models include:

Hohner Sonny Boy, no catalog number, a cheap Chinese Hohner with plastic comb, no production date found. 10 holes, 8 reeds, 4-5/8ths inches long. Probably a single reed diatonic.

Hohner Sonny Boy #2004: 12 double holes, 24 reeds, wood comb, nails, a C tremolo.
#2044: 14 double holes, 28 reeds, wood comb, nails, C tremolo.
#2055: 16 double holes, 32 reeds, wood, nails, C tremolo.
#2064 20 double holes, 40 reeds, wood, nails, C tremolo.

Christian Weiss Sonny Boy This was the original Sonny Boy harmonica series, made from (1910?-1928) by the Ch.Weiss harmonica company (1855-1928), of Trossingen, Germany, founded by Christian Weiss senior (1833-1908). When Hohner bought the Weiss company in 1928, Hohner continued selling many Weiss harmonicas, under the Weiss name. That's why I think the Sonny Boy harps were not named after the USA blues harmonica players listed above.

The Weiss harmonica company made many different harmonica models, including at one time or another, Artist, Asta Nielsen, Brass Band, Brass Band Soloist, Clarion, Flora, Paradise Music, Pearl, Angel's Clarion, World's Triumph, Elegie, Pipeolion, Facilita, Metalla, Three Little Boys, and others. At the start of the last century (1900s), Weiss was the world's 3rd most popular harmonica company, behind #1 Hohner and #2 Andreas Koch, of Trossingen, Germany.

Hering Rollinha #9548: This model has 12 double holes, 24 reeds, and it's a 2-sided tremolo harp, last seen in the 2002 Hering catalog. it has a wood comb, and is a beginners harp.

Hering Escolor? Nothing was found about this harmonica.

Johann Kostler Rigoletto, Firefly Rigoletto: The Johann Kostler company was founded in 1891 in Graslitz (today's Neuheim) in today's Czech Republic, just across the border from Klingenthal, Germany. It made harmonicas until 1973, when it changed to auto parts.

Johann Kostler was an opera fan, and named many of his harmonica models after operas.

When the Wilhelm Thie harmonica co. of Vienna ("Wien") Austria went out of business in 1922, Kostler bought the parts and machines. Friedrick Wilhelm Thie founded the Thie company in Vienna in 1834. He was a Prussian engineer, and the Thie products were by reputation the world's highest quality harmonicas.

Best regards

John Broecker


Last edited by john_broecker on Tue Nov 08, 2011 6:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 3:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Anton07.

This is the 4th of 4 parts about the harmonicas in your collection. It's mostly about Weiss harmonicas.

Weiss Brass Band was a large series of at least 8 different harmonicas made from (a guess) 1896 -1928, and possibly beyond 1928, when Hohner bought the Weiss company.

The Weiss harmonica company was founded in 1855, 2 years before Hohner. Hohner spied on the Weiss company to learn the business, just as Christian Weiss spied on the Messner harmonica company of Trossingen, to learn the craft.

Let's see if we can find your Brass Band harmonica. You didn't specify which model you have. All of these harmonicas have wood combs and nails:

Brass Band #822: 10 holes, 20 reeds, a single reed per note diatonic harmonica, it was patented to Frank Scribner, Weiss New York City chairman, in 1896. It cost 25 cents USA in 1908.

Brass Band #824:10 double holes, 40 reeds, an octave harp, cost 50 cents in 1908.

Brass Band #827: 10 double holes, 40 reeds, octave harp, 50 cents in 1908.

Brass Band Tremolo #826: 16 double holes 32 reeds, tremolo, 50 cents in 1908.

Brass Band Soloist #549:10 holes, 20 reeds, diatonic, 25 cents.

Brass Band Soloist #553: 10 double holes, 40 reeds, octave, 50 cents.

Brass Band Soloist #549-1/2:10 holes, 20 "bell metal" reeds, diatonic,75 cents. Bell metal reeds were probably high tech for their day, like today's phosphor bronze reeds.

Brass Band # 822-B: Same as #822, with a bell attached, 35 cents.

Here's a poem from a Brass Band advertisement of the early 1900s:

"We used to play the other kind,
Our papa he did, too.
Now we play the Wiess Brass Band,
And nothing else will do."


Here are more harmonicas on your list, but I've found nothing about them:

Weiss 3 Little Boys: This was probably an attempt to copy the Hohner 3 Sisters harps, but that is only a guess.

Unknown brands:

Astra-Delicia (possibly a Weiss product).
Radio
Popular-Delicia
Three Graces
Artist-Delicia, Artist-Ligna (possibly Weiss products).

Please post a request if I've missed any harps on your harmonica list.

Best regards

John Broecker


Last edited by john_broecker on Tue Nov 08, 2011 6:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 4:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:28 am
Posts: 7
Jeeze thanks for all the effort now I have some idea which ones I want to keep and start to learn playing

I have another 2 that i'm giving to my sister as her surname is the same and didn't put them on the list and unable to find info


1 x Koch-Harmonica – Alphina – C
1 x Koch-Harmonica – Alphina – CG


So if you can get anything about these it would also be greatly appreciated


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 4:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello Again, Anton07.

You might be interested in the sources I use to find the harmonica companies' history, trademark logos, biographical information, product names and approximate years of model productions.

Harmonica Makers of Germany & Austria, 2003, by Martin Haffner and Lars Lindenmuller, published by the Deutsches Harmonika Museum, Trosingen, Germany. This is the best historical source for over 250 German, Austrian and Czech harmonica makers from 1826-1990. The book doesn't go deeply into product names & models.
Website: www.harmonika-museum.de

The Trumpet Call, quarterly periodical of the Harmonica Collectors International (HCI), edited & published by Harland Crain, president HCI, Chesterfield (near St. Louis), Missouri, USA. E-mail: hcrain@harleysharps.com This is the best source for product model details, estimated product production dates, and stories about the manufacturers, and products.

Your Koch Alpina (Alphina?) tremolos were made by the Andreas Koch company of Trossingen, Germany, up to 1928, when Hohner bought the Koch company. Hohner continued production of many Koch models with the Koch name after 1928, and may make the Alphinas today, for the European market. I'll get more information.

Up until 1928, the Koch company was the world's #2 harmonica company in annual product sales, behind Hohner.

Best Regards

John Broecker


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2011 5:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:54 pm
Posts: 1738
Location: Sussex, Wisconsin, USA
Hello, Anton07.

I couldn't find any information on your Koch Alphina harmonicas, but I've seen that model somewhere.

One of the models is in C, the other model is a double-sided harmonica, in C one side,G on the other side.

Best Regards

John Broecker


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group