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Tootler replied to the topic 'Beer Barrel Polka--July Song of the Month' in the forum. 2 hours 24 minutes ago

Marcy wrote:

That is a better one, Tootler. Multi-track recording does really make you consider timing and a lot of other little things you miss playing live. I find it's really helpful once you've got the tune down too. Glad you posted an update!

Thanks, Marcy. I'm usually pretty good on timing with standard fiddle tunes and I can add accompaniments and other melody instruments OK but this was more tricky because there was a fair bit of syncopation. The midi track acts a bit like a click track, in fact I usually add a click to make it easier to count held notes to their full value but having the melody there makes it easier when you have sections played off the beat. It also makes it easier to stay on time. With a click track, I will still stray off time if I'm not careful.

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Tootler replied to the topic 'August songs of the month that weren't chosen' in the forum. 2 hours 31 minutes ago

Here's a couple of pictures of the mic.


[File Attachment: HarpMicFront.JPG]

[File Attachment: HarpMicRear.JPG]

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Tootler replied to the topic 'August songs of the month that weren't chosen' in the forum. 2 hours 33 minutes ago

Here is Marmalade Polka. I've combined it into a set with another tune, Vedder Michel. Vedder Michel is a German tune but it's also found in England as Turk's March No. 1. The English version is more notey in the B section but I've kept it closer to the German version.

I've just bought a new harp mic - a Shaker dynamic mic. It's pretty compact and comfortable in the hand and has a volume control so you can control the level at the mic. It definitely changes the sound of the harp - gives it a more bluesy sound. Not sure that it's entirely appropriate to English Traditional dance tunes but it is what it is.
youtu.be/2HRe-rl9ax0

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Eric33 replied to the topic 'Harp cleaning' in the forum. 2 hours 49 minutes ago

Hi Keith,as you know,I am solely a chromatic player.I clean my harmonicas around about every 4 to 5 months. I remove the 4piece mouth assembly and side plates,put the buffers and screws to one side.Put the mouth assembly and plates in very hot to boiling water,clean the parts with an old toothbrush,then put them in the Fridge for 20 minutes.( if the hot operation don't kill the bugs the cold will) Then on assembly,I put a smear of pure Olive Oil on the extreme ends of the button slide ONLY and as I tighten the screws I keep checking that the slide is free.Then I hold the harp up to the light to check that there is no light showing through the mouth piece and that's about it.Hope this helps.Eriic33.

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skyguy thanked Reed Smith in topic Steve Vai on harmonica 3 hours 12 minutes ago
Reed Smith replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. 4 hours 34 minutes ago

@Todd, (Skyguy)
I tend to think of a beat as having three parts: the front, the middle or center, and lastly but certainly not the
least, the all important back. If you hear something that really grabs your ear in the jazz, blues, rock, funk,
even some country, chances are very good that the groove is behind the beat. The shuffle, one of the most
recognizable grooves in rock, blues, country, etc. derives from the percussionist lick known as the "Flam".
Two sticks striking nearly simultaneously, but one ahead of the other, the result is a sort of *pa-dot. Shuffles
and back beats derive from "Dot" that comes after the "pa" or center of the beat (where the count would be,
as in 1, 2, 3, 4,). *pa-dot" is my own phonetic sounding, and in no way written in stone anywhere!
The best advice I can give to any musician but especially harmonica players is to stop tapping your foot, and
use your body as a metronome, a sympathetic sway so to speak. Foot tapping is for drummers as I have found
it tends to speed standing players. FIND YOUR OWN GROOVE! Playing behind the beat is cool, but you can also
play in front and right on it too, mess with it, I think you'll find in duo context, playing behind will fatten the groove
and allow you to stretch come time to do so.
Regards, Reed
"Breathe The Harmonica"

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skyguy replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. 7 hours 44 minutes ago

Good stuff! Appreciate the examples you gave .. I will study them carefully.
I use first and third positions more than I use second position.. so should be able to relate to Jimmy Reed.
Listened to an Al Blake interview.. and he really believes in studying Little Walter & his predecessor Sonny Boy Williamson.

I know my way around the harp.. I just need to work on my foundation.
Cheers, Todd

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skyguy thanked Reed Smith in topic Steve Vai on harmonica 8 hours 30 minutes ago
Marcy replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. 12 hours 4 minutes ago

Whatever you call it works for me. Thanks, Reed.

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Reed Smith replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. 18 hours 11 minutes ago

I guess I am using old terminology. Usually the root of the first chord played is the key of
the tune, but not always, it could be the fourth, fifth, etc. I am referring to the chord played and
my use of notes against it in an ensemble, it is a reference point and not a rule. Sometimes you
get it from a note, sometimes from the chord, but I want to know where it lies in the structure.
I came up playing with black bands, sometimes I was the only white guy, I realize that my words
aren't always the best but it's how I learnt it.
Regards, Reed
"Breathe The Harmonica"

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Marcy replied to the topic 'Beer Barrel Polka--July Song of the Month' in the forum. 20 hours 15 minutes ago

That is a better one, Tootler. Multi-track recording does really make you consider timing and a lot of other little things you miss playing live. I find it's really helpful once you've got the tune down too. Glad you posted an update!

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Marcy replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. 20 hours 28 minutes ago

Chord figure? That's a term I haven't heard before. Can you elaborate on that?

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Reed Smith replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. 21 hours 41 minutes ago

Skyguy,
Arpeggios are good ways to find your way around unfamiliar tunes. Another trick that came to
almost serendipitously was to listen for the chord figure before you begin to play. I listened to
Little Walter a lot coming up, and he would come in behind the beat, I thought it was a groove
thing because to do it does fatten the groove, so I incorporated it into my phrasing. Years later I
played with a country/rock singer who never used a set list so the most I might know before we
started a tune was the key. I began to listen for the chord figure before I played and it put me
right in there with the fiddle player, a lady later complimented me and the fiddle player saying
how she had never heard harmonica and fiddle played together like that and how cool it was.
It was the first night we had met each other! It was afterward when I thought about it that I realized
this is what Little Walter was doing all along.
If your guitarist is into it, maybe try some Jimmy Reed stuff, yeah Jimmy plays a lot of first position
but that should be no problem to learn if you have your bends down, specifically draw two, draw three,
blow bends eight, nine and ten. Jimmy's stuff is very straight forward but offers a whole lot of room for
stretching out. And remember, just because it is played in first position doesn't mean that second won't
work on some stuff. Another guy who does some very accessible acoustic type blues is "Big Al Blake"
This cat blows some serious harp using expression over pyrotechnics, very cool stuff, and some of it
can be done in a duo context. John Hammond junior does some real nice acoustic blues. Listen, listen,
listen, get it in your head. You are supposed to listen twice as hard as you play, that is why God gave you
two ears, but only one mouth.
Regards, Reed
"Breathe The Harmonica"

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gunsmoke and SWAPAN DEB have commented on gunsmoke's video yesterday

thanks

Sweet Hour Of Prayer

via YouTube Capture

Harpoman has liked a Video yesterday

Moon River

A tune for easy playing and listening.

Harpoman has liked a Video yesterday

Beer Barrel Polka - Recorder, Harmonica & Ukulele

For Season 236 of the Ukulele: http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/forumdisplay.php?47-Seasons-of-the-Ukulele. Commonly known as "Roll Out The...

skyguy replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. yesterday

Awesome.. that is the kind of feedback i need! I will try that. Thanks!

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skyguy thanked Reed Smith in topic Steve Vai on harmonica yesterday
Reed Smith replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. yesterday

I dunno, it sounds like two different songs played together. Playing over vocals has always
been a no no, playing between vocal phrases is the way to go. When playing along with a
guitar, try to hit target notes that correspond to the chord being played. For instance on the 1
or tonic, play the tonic note, it will sound better, more together. The goal is to sound like one
voice, one instrument, making this music. Ask your guitarist what chords are used, find the
target notes and WRITE THEM DOWN, writing them down will engrain this into your memory,
you'll feel like you have taken a giant step forward.
Regards, Reed
"Breathe The Harmonica"

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skyguy replied to the topic 'Steve Vai on harmonica' in the forum. yesterday

My first open mic with a guitarist friend of mine. No Steve Vai yet. :)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ht5llMjYS4c&feature=youtu.be

Sound setup wasn't the best, and I know I need to work on my technique.. but was looking forward to doing this for a long time.

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